Early Retirement Blog

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a blog focused on Financial Independence (not as much on Retire Early). It is a blog by an Indian immigrant in Germany, and his struggle to. Unabhängigkeit oder dein (early) Retirement erreichst. In diesem Sinne: Carpe diem und viel Spaß auf meinem Blog. Katrin / Financial Independence Rocks! und ein Interview mit William Bengen auf Early Retirement Dude's Blog. FIRE-Blogger, hat dies die „Shockingly Simple Math behind Early. Retired At 44 (Guest Post From A Non-Blogging, Work Optional High Cost Of Living Dwelling Lady) - Tread Lightly, Retire Early. I met Liz back in November of​. A practical action guide for financial independence and early retirement from the popular Our Next Life blogger. In today's work culture, we're expected to hustle.

Early Retirement Blog

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Steve believes that you should have the freedom to make choices you want to make and not one tied down to a job. Favorite Post: High Income Debt.

Big ERN retired from his job in June and he immediately started to travel around the world, visiting more than 20 countries! Now he writes about his journey on his blog and he shows you exactly how he reached financial freedom to retire early.

RBD runs the awesome blog Retire Before Dad, and while RBD is not an early retiree, yet, his story is truly awesome and you will pick up some great tips to use to reach financial freedom.

His goal is to, well you may have guessed it, to retire before his dad. So he set a goal to retire at age 55 and he is on track to do so!

RBD writes about how you can build multiple streams of income to live the life of your dreams and for RBD this involves traveling which he also writes about on his blog!

Retire Before Dad is one of the best early retirement blogs due to the fact that RBD writes in-depth content and he is super transparent with his journey to early retirement.

Check out the awesome blog Retire Before Dad. Jim is the author behind the amazing blog Route To Retire and he retired from his job at age 43 at the end of !

Jim has figured out the path to early retirement and he knows that with simple changes and a mindset shift, you can do it too.

Through living modestly and investing, Jim was able to reach financial freedom and he is sharing his story and journey with you on Route To Retire. Definitely check out his blog!

Jason from Mr. Free At 33, as you probably guessed it, retired at the super young age of 33 and is now living the life of his dreams in Thailand!

He started to learn about investing and then he started cutting his expenses and investing more. Jason kept doing this and his money started compounding which got him to financial independence at age 33!

Free At 33! Cubert runs the incredible blog Abandoned Cubicle where he writes all about early retirement, the good and the bad!

Cubert knows that money is not everything and even though you might want to retire early, it might not be right for you and he discusses all of this on his blog.

Join Cubert on Abandoned Cubicle and learn all about what early retirement is and figure out if it is right for you!

PoF from the impressive blog Physician On Fire is an Anesthesiologist who attained financial independence at age 39 but continues to work because he enjoys his job.

You can do whatever you want! Physician On Fire is an early retirement blog mainly geared towards physicians usually with high-income and large student loan debt but there are tips on this blog for all looking to retire early.

So head over to Physician On Fire and check out his story on early retirement! Todd, the founder of Financial Mentor runs one of the best early retirement blogs on the web and the credit is due to the fact that Todd is a true finance guru!

He has an extensive background in finance and has written multiple books on different areas in personal finance. Todd wants you to reach financial freedom so you can focus on what you deeply care about so you can live a fulfilled life.

I love this because it relates very closely with my focus! Can I retire is an awesome blog that focuses largely on early retirement for baby boomers but honestly, everyone can find tremendous value from this blog.

Darrow is the founder of Can I Retire Yet and by saving most of his income and investing his money he was able to retire at age 50! He knows that early retirement is definitely possible if you focus on saving your money and making it work for you.

Patience is the key to retiring early and Darrow is giving you all the information you need on this simple formula to retiring early on Can I Retire Yet , so check it out!

RIP runs the killer blog Retire In Progress where he shares his journey to early retirement with you at full transparency! RIP is an Italian native that is currently living in Switzerland.

On the journey to early retirement, that means thinking about how we treat our money now, and not always thinking back about how we used to relate to it.

A question we ask ourselves all the time is: Do we just want to retire early because deep down we feel bad at working?

Which makes us wonder: for those special few who are seriously incredible at their jobs, would early retirement even enter their minds?

Come share your theories! And given my gold star-seeking tendencies, how can I redefine my self worth post-career without falling into the digital stats trap?

What would it take for you? And health is super important to us. An interesting thing happens with a lot of financial independence bloggers.

As your audience grows, you suddenly have this incredibly opportunity not only to reach more readers, but to earn more from the blog. Which is wonderful!

Reaching financial independence is, more than anything, a waiting game. But, the journey still takes years, often many years. The fact that we are retiring at the end of this year is getting more and more real for us, and some of that feels scary.

But it also feels crazy exciting for obvious reasons, and for less obvious ones like the forthcoming opportunity to re-engineer our lives to reinforce better habits and avoid triggering the bad ones associated with our current work lives.

The best thing the Affordable Care Act did for early retirees was introduce some level of predictability about health care costs, and all indications are that that predictability is about to go away, no matter where things land with a new health care law.

Money is only a tiny piece of this, and not what most of us will be thinking about daily once we stop working. Real retirement planning is planning for all the rest of life that comes post-career, and for us, a big part of that is travel.

Though early retirement feels like a big goal in and of itself and it is! We offer some suggestions here! It can be hard to believe that we have the right to do some things just because we feel like it.

Today, we give you permission to do exactly that, and share some of our most bratty financial decisions.

Blogging is a hugely time-consuming endeavor, and anyone who tells you otherwise is selling something.

Today, a closer look at how blogging has sped our progress to financial independence and early retirement. Will we feel invisible?

How can we let go of the fake importance and focus on replacing what truly matters to us? The question of when to retire this year — Work the full year?

Retire sooner if we hit our numbers? Living in the mountains has taught us that catastrophe comes quickly — wildfires can wipe out whole communities in the blink of an eye.

Today is our second blogiversary! But in other, more important ways, SO MUCH has changed in our lives, driven in large part by this blog and the awesome people who read it.

And something that keeps coming up a lot is anxiety about what it will be like when we quit — not our post-work life, but the actual act of quitting itself.

Today: When loyalists contemplate quitting. I never took a break between high school and college, or between college and starting my career.

It has been wonderful to celebrate a steady string of financial milestones over the years, but outside of those moments of celebration, it all actually feels less real, not more real.

Is it just us? Today, an amazing thing happened. We woke up in a house that is completely ours. Happy new year! Welcome to our , the Year of No, preamble to our retired Life of Yes.

Will we pay down the mortgage or pad our taxable accounts? How did our look in the end? When will we retire in ?

Plus, happy holidays! Sending lots of holiday love! On some level, we all crave the meaning and satisfaction that come with work, but the realities of modern work are very different from that work ideal.

Learning to recognize the difference between work itself and work culture — and likewise the difference between job burnout and a true dead end career — can help us zero in on why we want to retire early to begin with.

Do we consider an unqualified success? Read on! Today: the story of our retirement timing role reversal. But this year, with retirement on the horizon, and our savings ahead of schedule for the year, we have some tougher decisions to make.

Add to that our ongoing work stress, and it all has us wondering what would happen if we retired today.

Today, we explore that thought experiment. Today: a nudge. Not just to tune in to your gratitude, and to express it out loud! But to go beyond gratitude to real generosity and action.

Our world depends on it! Subsidies are in the air right now, with them likely disappearing for health care under the next administration.

Think tax credits and deductions, and public services across the spectrum. Today, how subsidies have made my success in life possible, and how they are making our early retirement possible, even without the ACA.

This is a non-political post at a politically charged time. The majority of people are forced to retire before they want to.

For us, an upgraded level of travel is chief among those, but the perks we enjoy from work are different for each of us.

Today, a post about the under-recognized benefits of spending less in early retirement, because spending less means earning less, and earning less means a whole bunch of benefits.

Psst: the biggest one is insulation from Obamacare price hikes. Our FI life is still life, with all the usual ups and downs.

Some things are better, but most things are the same. This year has taught us: Financial independence is a good goal, but a bad goalpost.

Our early retirement plan has gone through a lot of iterations, but one thing has remained constant: our insistence that we never want to have to work again.

Come join us as we trace our journey to our recent epiphany that we will earn money in the future, even after we retire. Jim retired at age 30 after selling his massively successful blog, Bargaineering.

We are not the poster children for frugality or for minimalism, but we are constantly surrounded by people who have bought all these things.

It only makes you look like you are good at something, versus actually being good at it. We will be different, too. And it has us wondering: How well do we really know our post-retirement selves?

And how well do we know post-retirement us, as a married couple? The good financial news keeps rolling in over here at the Our Next Life house.

One of my favorite parts of FinCon was getting the chance to talk to bloggers who are ahead of us on their FIRE journeys, including several who are already retired.

I asked them all if their last year of work was harder, and answers were mixed. It all seemed to come down to how much they cared about work in the home stretch, and it has gotten us wondering whether we can care less to make our last year less stressful.

My vision for this blog is a lot more clear, but most of all, I was continually floored by the warmth, openness and generosity of the entire community there.

Bonus: An update on our progress, and lots of graphics on creating a next life vision based on presence of awesomeness, not absence of work.

Can you relate? As early retirement gets closer, something that we find ourselves getting especially impatient about is the arbitrary nature of deadlines.

The notion of being free from deadlines can be extremely appealing, especially for procrastinators like us.

But is a deadline-free life really a good thing? We bet you can! Bonus: lots of geek-worthy charts and graphs! The decisions that went into it were about a lot more than the bottom line.

As we get closer and closer to our retirement date, the idea that we are actually going to retire early is becoming real.

Today, a short list of things you can do right this very second to make a difference in the world. Our aspiration: switch to a life of yes very soon.

Thanks to thinking about early retirement pretty much all the time, reading lots of thought-provoking blogs about it, and of course writing about it in a few thousand words a week, our thinking has continued to evolve.

In other words: We need more friends! Plus, having good friends does wonders for mental and physical health, especially as we age.

We have said from our second post ever that our vision for early retirement has never included mandatory work. But… that might be changing. Your own finance philosophy should follow out of what makes you truly happy.

This is a big one! For us, happiness right now means not waiting to become our best selves. I am definitely a planner by nature, which means that we have all kinds of contingency plans, emergency preparedness plans, you name it.

But I recently realized that I tend to plan for the worst only, and not for the almost worst. And we bet you do too! So today, a call to action.

Do it now. I recently had a realization that I now think has been influencing the entire direction of my life without me realizing it.

We spend a lot of time looking forward, and projecting future health care needs, where our income could come from and of course all the feelings.

Right now we have some issues in our house that need fixing. He is super happy. I split the money and put it in the Fidelity Zero total market fund in his account.

Thanks for the list. I recently started a blog, inspired by yours and many others from this list. This is all so inspiring. I am hoping to leave the rat race for good within the next 3 years.

Wish me luck!! I love market research gigs. When people do side hustles outside of a full-time job, they should only focus on one that pays well and provides enough satisfaction.

Food taster?! That sounds like my kind of side gig! How did you discover that? Are you tasting food prepared by culinary students? RB40 read about it.

I have no idea who will cook these meals. Food scientists? They have their own restaurants. Great list, Joe! Your blog amongst a few others were the reason why I started a simple living lifestyle blog about a year ago.

Thank you! Retiring early, I hope, will start to become more popular. But that can only happen if people prepare for it. I am up to 12 clean pull ups…I am 40 and a father of two young boys….

I hope to get to your level soon…. You mentioned affiliate income dropping. Many markets are now becoming saturated and can cause a lot of problems for the more established individuals in the market.

Great retirement blog list. Hey RB I also started blog to share my journey and also some information for India specific aspirants.

Interesting to see your early retirement schedule. Do you stick onto this everyday. I dont see mention of video games here. Do you play that?

The list of blogs mentioned here each has different story. I love Financial Samurai and Budgets are Sexy too. Thanks for including my blog, Joe.

Now if I could just get to 20 pull-ups…. I feel privileged, thanks so much for including me in the list, and for giving some more blogs to check out.

Wow, more blogs to read! Will I have the time? But seriously, thanks for the list. I enjoy reading your blog. Keep up the good work! Sleep is greatly disrupted by using our devices too close to bed time.

Lots of information about the disruptions caused by light emitted by phones and all styles of computers out there for you to read. Try stopping all devices one hour before bed and reading a book or watching an actual tv instead of something on your tablet.

As always a good list of resources. I also like that you have a good structured day, very important with kids.

Hi Joe, thanks a lot for the mention. You got a busy schedule every day. A good sleep is as important as a healthy diet.

Take care. I already offered to take you out for some Khao Soi when you make it around to Chiang Mai. That was before this.

I need to add the skill of shameless plugs to my repertoire. You are such a leader! Thank you for including me. I love reading the great posts out there and appreciate your list.

Nice list. Some I had already followed and agree with you are outstanding. Have to check out the ones I am not familiar with.

There are more and more physician blogs popping up about FI and some FIRE like mine because of burnout that has started to rear its ugly head in the practice of medicine.

I unfortunately only see that trend of burnout driving docs to FIRE continuing. Hey Joe, Thanks for including us on this list. Great list Joe!

This is a great list, thanks for sharing. Your blog has been a great inspiration to my boyfriend and I who are just starting our FIRE journey from Sweden, yessss so much taxes ftw and it is very cool to have blogs like yours to browse through to see that the goal is actually achievable Keep it up!!

Not a bad score x Sam is one of my favorite bloggers too. I always learn something new when I read his posts. Thanks for the comprehensive list Joe.

Many good resources and sites here. Happy Thanksgiving! Happy Thanksgiving, Joe! I was busy prepping for our Thanksgiving hotpot and trying to cook turkey for the 1st time today.

When I checked your blog, I was already commenter Congrats on a successful year of blogging traffic and income!

Go Joe! Great list of blogs … I have been reading many of them … as for books in the FIRE global expat area …. I found the best selling author..

I wrote about some of this in my blog …. All of them are from our community so it really hits home to me and gives me a sense of pride and gratitude.

Wow, thanks a lot for all these links. Money Mustache were the two blogs that convinced me to retire early in It discusses not just the how, but the philosophy and mindset necessary for achieving early retirement.

Highly recommended! Hey Joe, I really appreciate the shout out. FYI, Mrs. Groovy and I both retired on October 14th. Great list and thanks for pointing it out.

I will check out some of the ones I have not read yet. Your food looks awesome. The aftermath lol. Great article. Ive been doing some research about retiring and ive read a few blogs and listened to a few podcasts.

I have been following there ideas. Sounds like you had a pretty fun spring break! Thanks for sharing your extensive list of early retirement blogs, I will definitely try to take a look at as many as I can.

Wow what a pool of resources! It will take me a while to read through all of these blogs. Thanks for sharing! Middleton Methods has a great podcast on retirement.

Thanks so much for the mention, Joe! Awesome list of blogs, I follow a lot of them, but definitely more to check out. It looks like you had a fantastic spring break, amazing how fast time flies by.

We mostly spend our Spring Break around home too. As for the blogs, I love Millenial Revolution.

I have a dark sense of humor, so I love to laugh when I read a blog, especially about finances. Sounds like a great spring break. Thanks for sharing all of the blog links.

Always looking to follow more. There is a lot to learn when it comes to ER. Not there yet Joe but working on it like a few others…. Started my own blog a couple of weeks ago and getting inspiration and responses from other bloggers is definitely the fun part.

Thanks again for the listing Joe — Its very helpful for beginners such as myself. I read some of these blogs including yours and Mr MM and you guys are great role models.

Thanks so much for including me on your list, Joe. It means a lot coming from you! Happy new year! Thanks for the mention, Joe — very much appreciated!

Happy Holidays! Cool you brought this list back to the forefront. I love the blog list. More importantly, the presents. We went to see Rogue One because we are huge Star Wars nerds, but I might have to splurge and pick up the lightsaber for myself.

That is why we want kids to make excuses to buy toys for us. Happy Holidays…love the presents. Thanks so much for the mention!

Our life is a bit unconventional. Thanks for including me in your list. Have a very Merry Christmas and Holiday season everybody!

Hi Joe, I have been a silent reader of your blog for years. You have been an inspiration for me to start my own website to chronicle my journey towards retirement though technically, I am FI.

Hope you find my blog interesting. Would love to your views on my articles. Your blog is good.

Nice thought provoking articles. Great job so far. Keep it up and good luck! Hi Joe, I just started in May and have a few posts so far, but my early retirement blog is:.

Thanks for sharing the list Mr RB40! This is really inspiring article. It really turns me on to be motivated. Thank you for sharing.

Another good one is Canadian Dream-Free at Especially relevant to your Canadian readers and now maybe folks that want to retire to Canada if Trump wins the presidency!

Happy 4th All! Thank you for compiling this list. I follow a majority of these blogs and know that they teach me something new every time I read.

I also especially like financial samurai! Hey man, first time on your blog here. I need some networking hehe.

Thanks for sharing this! Love 4th of July as well and am even more excited to think of new ways on the side hustles, to save money and looking forward to the last day the stock market is open before it takes a break next Monday on the 4th.

Appreciate it and Happy 4th! There are some real gems in there! Thanks for including us on this list. Joining this community has been one of our best decisions ever.

Thanks so much for the shout out, Joe! And thanks for the great recommendations too! This list was perfect!

The links you posted are very helpful and appreciated. The Frugal Woods couple is adorable and I look forward to checking out more of the links.

Thanks for sharing this list. Money Mustache. Anyhow, thanks for sharing these other blogs. Thanks for the compliment.

Enjoy your last few years at work. Good luck! Thanks for the shout out!

Paul Francis November 7,pm. After Pez Gaming realized that we would Casino Bad Wildungen in early retirement, we also realized that we needed an easy way to decide if an opportunity that came along was actually work we wanted to do. Older posts. He writes with utmost honesty, sharing his failures, and how he reinvented himself to be where he is now. And that realization changed everything. With only about three months left to work — forever! Awesome list! Frugal Living articles.

Early Retirement Blog Video

Withdrawal Strategies for Early Retirees Nov 1, - I officially reached FIRE (financial independence, retire early) the #worklife #financialfreedom #inspiration #financeblogger #selfhelp #highvibe. Nov 7, - Financial Independence Retire Early – FIRE Finanzielle Nina's Blog. Finanzielle Unabhängigkeit vorzeitig ausscheiden - FIRE - Retirement. Vor anderthalb Jahren schrieb er für seinen Blog Healthy Habits einen Artikel Teilzeitjob oder Early Retirement – Was darf's für dich sein? Design-Wettbewerbs in der Kategorie Logo erhalten: Gewinner. Gewinner des Wettbewerbs "Design an impactful logo for an early retirement blog" in der. FIRE - das steht für»Financial Independence, Retire Early«. Im Blog von»Mr. Money Mustache«, einem sehr bekannten»Guru«der.

Early Retirement Blog Video

Extreme Frugal Minimalists Plan to Retire by Age 35!

Fast forward seven years, he retired, moving to Chiang Mai, Thailand and living off his dividends. He writes about geolocation arbitrage and the expat lifestyle.

His blog offers a no-nonsense take how anyone can live financially free. Extra points because he is very honest about his affiliate relationships.

Tanja and her husband retired at the end of at 38 and 41, respectively. Their blog offers glimpses into their personal journey to FI, chronicling the emotional highs and lows of leaving the job force and moving to a small ski town.

Burnt out from his tech career notice a pattern? One of the younger retirees in the bunch, Root of Good gave up the working life at the ripe old age of Impressively, he and his wife did this without high flying tech salaries or stock options.

Tawcan is a Canadian blogger with a goal of reaching financial independence in His strategy is using his dividend income to cover his annual living expenses.

Get a job. Buy a house. Retire at Written by a couple who decided to invest their money in the stock market instead of buying a house in Toronto, Millenial Revolution makes a compelling case for forsaking the debt-ladden white picket fence.

Even for a community of savers, this blog is extreme. The angle? ESI Money regularly features interviews with millionaires who share how they got there.

Unlike most FIRE blogs, the focus is on entrepreneurialism rather than frugality. Want to retire early? You can save more or you can make more. Steve is very much in the second camp.

Instead, Steve provides an actionable blueprint for starting an e-commerce business. He left his six-figure job in tech after his e-commerce company, which sells cloth napkins, brought in eight times more money than his salary.

Read on to find out! Which helps you save faster for early retirement: big cities, which tend to be more expensive, or small towns, which may be cheaper but may also have less opportunity and higher costs in some areas.

It sounds great from a tax perspective, but do you actually come out ahead? Is there no consequence to having a high-deductible plan?

For a long time, I let myself go down the magical thinking rabbit hole, convincing myself that early retirement would cure everything in my life that needed fixing.

And even after I recognized that magical thinking for what it was, I still assumed that early retirement would fix a lot for us, especially things related to work stress and limited time.

So how has that actually turned out so far? The title of this one says it all. Well read on, because there are a bunch of reasons that just might help others feel better about the work you do en route to early retirement.

You might be surprised to know when I truly felt financially independent, and it had nothing to do with leaving behind my career or being able to sleep until noon every day if I feel like it.

Though those are pretty great, too. Instead, it was when I knew that Mark and I would both be okay financially whether we stay together or not.

I recently screwed something up, in part because I went the cheap route instead of spending money to do it right.

And it was expensive to fix. But in the end, it was exactly the nudge I needed to grab ahold of my freedom in a different way. Sounds deep, right?

Or is it? It is. We wasted no time in our hustle for new friends. Come see the results. I get that there are plenty of folks who see early retirement as a selfish, lazy act that will ultimately make us drains on society.

But those folks are ignoring the social good that each of us can do simply by quitting our jobs, as well as the incredible potential that early retirement offers each of us to do so much more.

The only problem? My old career involved rebranding organizations, and that was one of my favorite parts of the job. Come weigh in on what you want the new brand to reflect.

But we owe it to our readers to be more transparent and to be more in touch with what our readers are up against.

So why not plan for that and make your first year of early retirement a side hustle year? The benefits of doing so are potentially huge. Some recent home organizing brought me to a bit of an archaeological find: a snapshot of my finances almost exactly 10 years ago, before Mark and I got married.

You know all the math. Come find out. While the online financial independence community is fantastic for inspiration and support, having a real life circle of friends who are like-minded on money comes with enormous benefits.

Plus, enter to win Mrs. Aligning your spending with your values with one of the first bits of advice many of us here when we get on the path to financial independence.

But that advice usually goes on to talk about value — specifically what you get most value from — and not really about values at all.

This is my case for why it serves you better to think about both what you value and your personal values when it comes to your spending and economic power.

Our lives lately have looked slightly less than, er, adult. Some days we wonder why there are no grownups here to tell us what to do, instead just leaving us alone to do as we please with no structure whatsoever.

We are scared. Just as anyone doing something big and at least a little bit risky should be. Do the roller coastering markets have you concerned about the your early retirement plan?

Sequence risk is by far the biggest risk early retirees face, and that risk can come from market crashes, long-term mediocre returns and even rising health care costs.

Fortunately, though, we can all put ourselves in a good position to head off that risk, without lengthening the timeline to early retirement, by making some smart choices with asset allocation and behavior.

And not just to one point in time, but to many! Sounds wacky, right? We think we did this wrong in starting out our early retirement with too many things, including three trips, a long to do list, and a mad scramble to get out the door to our first big international trip to Taiwan.

Or maybe we did it exactly right by accident? We achieved early retirement and financial independence as DINKs dual income, no kids , and of course having kids would change a bunch of things.

So tell us, what did we miss? After we realized that we would work in early retirement, we also realized that we needed an easy way to decide if an opportunity that came along was actually work we wanted to do.

Tell me how it went! Contrary to popular lore, there are lots of early retirees and aspirants who are like us — NOT naturally frugal, and not naturally the most disciplined about money.

Today, a love letter to the atypical ones among us. Plus we talk about the challenge of projecting our income and revisit the benefits of keeping income low for health care purposes.

Well, we did it! We retired early! The very last Monday of our working careers. The whole point of our early retirement was to be able to say yes more, and some of the things we really want to be able to say yes to, money aside.

I asked it of myself constantly as a kid, and I never really stopped even as an adult in a career. Which might partially explain how I got on an early retirement path.

We officially have so few work days left that we can count them on our fingers and toes. Um, yeah, about that. How this point in time feels so different from what I expected.

When we first moved to Tahoe, we ran the heat at what seemed like a reasonable cool temperature, 62 or 63 or so, but then got a three-digit natural gas bill that started with a 4.

Which means that we need a new set of systems to ensure our financial success, especially given our status as anti-budgeters.

Just as we have a mission in early retirement to figure out what we want to do when we grow up, and to adventure more, we also have a mission to be more charitable, both by volunteering and by giving money directly to important causes.

Which may seem harder when we have less cash flow coming in. But there are some good ways to build charitable giving into your retirement financial plan, including with a donor advised fund.

Spoiler: We loved every second. But that all ends now! Come meet the real humans behind Our Next Life. So many of us, upon learning about early retirement, dive in headfirst, and discover this community full of people working toward the same goal.

And along the way, we adjust our baseline based on the people we meet here, and we might even forget that we are the outliers, not the normal ones.

Check out our plan for living beyond our budget — and then let us know what we missed! Give it a read and then let us know what you think!

Can I just keep typing exclamation points and have that count as an intro? Come see where we are, and then share your Q3 progress with all of us!

First up, an examination of the joint urges among FIers to DIY our lives and finances, but also to optimize as much as we can. Check out the DIY swag I made just for the lucky winners, and enter your guesses for where we live, what we do for work, and any other fun facts you want to throw out there.

Good luck! The financial aspects of the early retirement journey are well trod at this point: reduce your expenses, save at a high rate, invest in assets that create passive income, blah blah blah.

Read on for plenty of evidence. With only about three months left to work — forever! But we also wonder, what are we forgetting? Come chime in!

There is plenty of financial advice out there, including some very prescriptive advice about how to achieve financial independence or virtually any big goal you can think of.

The only problem is: that advice, while great for some, is guaranteed to be bad advice for others. We have. Better pay, more empowering conditions, parity, diversity, you name it.

The later years are also so much harder to predict — more variables, a longer time horizon, more unknown unknowns. I blog about money, of course, so I think about it a fair amount — though less […].

Best of all, there are definitely some big picture conclusions that apply to all FI bloggers. Whether you blog or not, come check out what we learned about you guys.

Bonus: more charts and pictures than ever before! Which means, very few substances are good or bad for us no matter what. Instead, what matters is how much of them we take.

What might be the problem, however, is the dose. Today is officially day in our countdown of workdays left before we pull the ripcord and end our careers.

Which is exciting! How things finally got real, and the unexpected feelings that came with that. Things have been moving quickly in the health care debate, which many of us on the verge of early retirement have been eyeing closely.

Just this week, the latest Senate proposals to reform the Affordable Care Act and the later proposal to repeal it altogether were withdrawn.

So where does that leave us all? What do we know? And more importantly, what do we still not know about health care and costs for early retirement?

The place we call home is a place lots of other people call their vacation destination, and that makes for some interesting dynamics.

A look at our new and revised definition of early retirement, and how the freedom to fail has helped us get here.

And while these things do make life easier, the question is: Is an easier life actually good for us? Is it good for our long-term brain health?

And if we go into that beginning with a limited set of options, and no ability to change our course, we could be setting ourselves up for a less-than-ideal future.

I spend a lot of time talking about the nobler aspects of early retirement like how it will give us time to do more volunteering. But can we all be honest?

Then after we pull the plug, we have a different set of things to do. Are we missing anything? Let us know! It is a natural thing to want to save money, and those of us pursuing huge financial goals innately find the idea of saving even more powerful.

Today, recognizing when saving money is actually spending money, and how to keep the focus on the saving itself. We love that more and more people are talking about prenups these days more financial transparency between partners is great!

The world is full of rankings telling us where the best places are to retire, but they tend to focus a lot on state tax rates and weather, even though surveys say that people care less about taxes and weather than other factors like overall cost of living and health care quality.

This post explores the health care quality factors we should all be weighting more heavily in deciding where to live in retirement, including some factors that none of the rankings take into account.

But most of all, we want to hear from you guys on this one — what do you think all FIers have in common, and can anyone become an FIer?

Come weigh in! Some possible fighting words today, as we delve into the question of whether it makes sense to think of both taxable funds and tax-advantaged retirement funds as one big pool of money.

Why does it matter? Because there are a bunch of potentially huge downsides to withdrawing traditional retirement funds early through Roth conversions or rule 72t distributions or different approaches that exist in other countries.

And of course I was drawn to the ones that felt safer. Until I saw with my own eyes, in my own finances and my own life, that sometimes the safest choice of all is actually the most risky.

And that realization changed everything. Which is all nice in theory, but does that principle stand up in the real world?

With this blog as our guinea pig, we put our ideals to the test. We have an opinion on this always do! In the last several months of contemplating leaving work, while doing a better job of saying no and setting boundaries woot!

Bad news for a soon-to-be early retiree, right? Not at all! You can definitely love your job and still want to retire early — no insanity required!

Think of your mission statement like a compass or GPS that helps you find your way if you ever start to wander off the path.

On the journey to early retirement, that means thinking about how we treat our money now, and not always thinking back about how we used to relate to it.

A question we ask ourselves all the time is: Do we just want to retire early because deep down we feel bad at working? Which makes us wonder: for those special few who are seriously incredible at their jobs, would early retirement even enter their minds?

Come share your theories! And given my gold star-seeking tendencies, how can I redefine my self worth post-career without falling into the digital stats trap?

What would it take for you? And health is super important to us. An interesting thing happens with a lot of financial independence bloggers.

As your audience grows, you suddenly have this incredibly opportunity not only to reach more readers, but to earn more from the blog. Which is wonderful!

Reaching financial independence is, more than anything, a waiting game. But, the journey still takes years, often many years.

The fact that we are retiring at the end of this year is getting more and more real for us, and some of that feels scary.

But it also feels crazy exciting for obvious reasons, and for less obvious ones like the forthcoming opportunity to re-engineer our lives to reinforce better habits and avoid triggering the bad ones associated with our current work lives.

The best thing the Affordable Care Act did for early retirees was introduce some level of predictability about health care costs, and all indications are that that predictability is about to go away, no matter where things land with a new health care law.

Money is only a tiny piece of this, and not what most of us will be thinking about daily once we stop working. Real retirement planning is planning for all the rest of life that comes post-career, and for us, a big part of that is travel.

Though early retirement feels like a big goal in and of itself and it is! We offer some suggestions here! It can be hard to believe that we have the right to do some things just because we feel like it.

Today, we give you permission to do exactly that, and share some of our most bratty financial decisions.

Blogging is a hugely time-consuming endeavor, and anyone who tells you otherwise is selling something. Today, a closer look at how blogging has sped our progress to financial independence and early retirement.

Will we feel invisible? How can we let go of the fake importance and focus on replacing what truly matters to us?

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